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La Roche-Posay in partnership with Macmillan Support
La Roche-Posay in partnership with Macmillan

La Roche-Posay strives to help people facing skin side effects of cancer treatments, partnering with Macmillan Cancer Support to help raise vital funds to support people living with cancer in the UK.




People with cancer have to endure so much, both emotionally and physically. For years, La Roche-Posay has worked to support people experiencing the unfortunate additional side effects that cancer treatment can itself cause. Now, in a landmark partnership with Macmillan Cancer Support, La Roche-Posay aims to provide resources and expert advice on how to alleviate these side effects and support patients as they undergo treatment.

Dr. Justine Hextall, Consultant Dermatologist

Consultant Dermatologist Dr Justine Hextall first became aware of the significance of skin issues in cancer treatment when her Consultant Oncologist husband would call and ask her advice. “I was surprised at the impact many of his treatments had on the skin,” Dr Hextall explains. “Crucially, sometimes vital cancer treatments had to be delayed or stopped due to skin side effects of the treatment. By combining our expertise, we were able to minimise the impact on skin and speed up the healing process.”

For over a decade, La Roche-Posay have worked closely with dermatologists worldwide like Dr Hextall, committed to improving the lives of people with cancer who are experiencing the changes the disease can cause to skin. Now, we are partnering with the UK’s leading cancer charity, Macmillan Cancer Support, to further support patients as they undergo treatment.

La Roche-Posay is signalling its passion and determination to improve the experience of cancer patients by donating £250,000 per year to Macmillan Cancer Support , which could help the experts on the Macmillan Support Line deal with more than 13,000 calls and web enquiries from people who want questions answered, need practical or emotional support, or just want to chat1.

Dany Bell, Treatment and Medicines Advisor at Macmillan Cancer Support, says “Certain cancer treatments can have a huge impact on people’s skin, leading to a number of unpleasant side effects such as irritation, dryness and spots. For many, this can make an already very difficult time even worse. At Macmillan, we are doing whatever it takes to make sure people with cancer have the support they need, which is why we are so delighted to be working with La Roche-Posay. Together, we're ensuring more people with cancer are supported with the right advice and options to help soothe their skin, which can make a world of difference as they go through treatment.”

It is a partnership that La Roche-Posay believe will take their steadfast support for cancer patients to a new level. Since 2008, La Roche-Posay have welcomed 21,000 patients with a range of skin conditions to their Thermal Centre in France, including many people with cancer.

Cancer support

Treatment-related skin problems affect many people with cancer. Experts often hear that patients consider supportive care, which can include addressing issues such as skin problems, to be as important as their primary treatments2. By 2025, La Roche-Posay aims to:

  • Educate 1 billion people around the world about the side effects of cancer treatments
  • Train 1 million people in supportive care and
  • Support 100,000 patients going through cancer treatment

Much still needs to change in the understanding and alleviation of the side effects of cancer treatment on the skin. La Roche-Posay believe this invaluable partnership with Macmillan Cancer Support will help start that life-changing revolution.

If you are currently living with, or affected by cancer, and need information, support or just someone to talk to, call 0808 808 00 00 or visit macmillan.org.uk

Registered with fundraising regulator

Alternatively, if you would like to donate to Macmillan to support the partnership, please scan the QR code or visit https://tinyurl.com/2p957n4b

1Macmillan Cancer Support internal data. £250,000 could support the charity’s Cancer Information and Support team on the Macmillan Support Line to deal with around 13,200 calls and web enquiries from people who need practical and emotional support, or help to navigate cancer services.

2Expert opinion from Prof. Ivan Krakowski, oncologist and president of the Association Francophone des Soins Oncologiques de Support (AFSOS)

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